Fermentation

Koralo to Launch New F!sh in More Restaurants in Seoul Following 5,000L Production Milestone

Koralo, a German B2B alternative seafood startup operating a subsidiary in South Korea, announces a milestone in the production of its flagship product called ‘New F!sh’, a mycelium-based fish fillet that debuted in Seoul last December. 

According to Koralo, it has successfully scaled its patented co-fermentation biomass process to 5,000 L on existing equipment manufacturers (OEM) with local partners in South Korea.

“Efficient scaling of local production allows Koralo to provide thousands of consumers with their New F!sh”

The company’s fermentation process harnesses the nutritional properties of microalgae to feed mycelium, replicating the natural diet of fish. This innovative process enables the creation of fish-like tasting and nutrient-rich alternatives in a sustainable process, emitting less CO2 and using less water than plant proteins.

Koralo has successfully scaled its patented co-fermentation biomass process to 5,000 L to produce alternative fish.
(Left) Dr. Guido Albanese (COO) and Sina Albanese (CEO) – Image courtesy of Koralo

Clean-label and nutritious fish 

New F!sh is said to be rich in nutrients, including omega-3, complete protein, probiotics, and vitamins B2 and B12. Additionally, it has a flaky, firm texture that mimics fish when grilled, steamed, stewed, or fried. 

Koralo was founded by Sina Albanese in 2022 in Munich, Germany, to offer sustainable and nutritious seafood alternatives. The startup has received cumulative investment and grants of €3.3 million supported by Fraunhofer Technologie-Transfer Fonds, Green Generation Fund, and Big Bang Angels. 

The company is building a pilot facility in Germany, but for now, it is focused on the South Korean market, where it has already launched its flagship fish fillet. With this scaling milestone, Koralo says it will be able to supply its clean-label fish fillet to more restaurants and food service distributors looking to provide seafood options.

Coral's fish fillet on a plate
© Koralo

Reaching more consumers

South Korea is among the countries with the highest seafood consumption worldwide. However, to diversify its protein sources from fish and meat, the country is embracing alternative proteins and has launched a plan to boost the plant-based food industry and encourage the adoption of alternatives to animal proteins.

Another company leveraging biomass fermentation to create mycelium ingredients for alternatives in the region is the Shanghai-based 70/30 Food Tech, which has launched a research lab in India to develop more affordable ingredients to accelerate mass adoption.

Meanwhile, Pacifico Biolabs is creating alternative seafood whole cuts in Germany using a unique biomass fermentation platform that combines several microorganisms, including mycelium.

“Efficient scaling of local production allows Koralo to provide thousands of consumers with their New F!sh products sustainably and at affordable prices,” says Koralo.




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