USA: New Meatless Campaign Promotes Kidney Health

Meatless Monday for Kidney Health
© The Monday Campaigns, Inc.

The US-based National Kidney Foundation (NKF) has recently formed a new partnership with the global health initiative The Monday Campaigns, which includes Meatless Mondays, to encourage Americans to make their diet healthier. Studies have shown that eating meatless foods and maintaining a balanced diet can slow the progression of kidney disease.

With a catchy advertising campaign and research showing the link between good general health and the vital role of the kidneys, the new campaign encourages all Americans to enjoy more meatless foods to support kidney function. With slogans like “Your kidneys keep you alive. The least you can do is give them a good meal,” followed by important information on how eating plant-based proteins instead of meat can help maintain kidney health, the campaign draws attention to the health benefits of a plant-based diet.

“Plant-based foods, including vegetables, fruits, whole grain products, nuts, seeds and legumes, have been shown to have a number of health benefits, including a lower body mass index (BMI), better control of blood pressure and inflammation, lower cholesterol levels and lower acid, sodium and phosphorus loads,” says Joseph Vassalotti, MD and Chief Medical Officer of the NKF. “Research shows that plant-based diets can be part of an effective lifestyle program to treat or slow down chronic kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease.”

The links between kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes are often overlooked. However, diabetes and hypertension are the main risk factors for the development of kidney disease, accounting for two-thirds of all cases. Kidney disease can also lead to high blood pressure and heart disease, which is the most common cause of death in kidney disease patients.

Ron Hernandez, Managing Director of The Monday Campaigns, says: “We know that dietary change is a challenge for people who are struggling with kidney disease, and we encourage them to give up meat one day a week. Our research shows that Monday is the day when the majority of people opt for positive, healthy change, giving them a better chance of continuing for the rest of the week. By promoting a meatless Monday practice, we hope to support people with kidney disease. Through this important change in diet, everyone can learn about the benefits of reducing meat consumption.”