Myodenovo aims to grows cultivated meat using plant-based scaffolds

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Cultivated Meat

ProFuse Technology Unveils Innovation That Enables 48-Hour Cultivated Meat Growth

Israeli biotech ProFuse Technology, a company at the forefront of muscle tissue growth, announces a tech breakthrough that it claims will mark a new era of cultivated meat production. According to the company, it has developed a scaffolding 3D growth technology that, along with its cell culture media and growth protocols, can accelerate muscle growth time fivefold. ProFuse Technology claims this advancement allows cultivated meat production within 48 hours, reducing the usual time by 80%. Moreover, this innovation enhances the protein content of muscle tissue by five times that of traditional meat, resulting in a more protein-rich alternative and achieving these improvements without using genetic modification. Dr. Tamar Eigler Hirsh, CTO of ProFuse Technology, says: “ProFuse Technology’s proprietary media supplements and protocols achieve effective muscle production …

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a collage of farm animals

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Cultivated, Cell-Cultured & Biotechnology

The Companies Removing Fetal Bovine Serum to Make Ethical, Slaughter-Free Meat

Last week, GOOD Meat received the first-in-the-world regulatory approval to use fetal bovine serum-free media in its cultivated poultry production process. With this significant milestone in the history of cultivated meat, we discuss the companies paving the way for ethical, slaughter-free meat. Removing fetal bovine serum (FBS) from cultivated meat production has been among the industry’s major challenges. FBS has been the default growth supplement for in vitro cell culture used by academic and industrial researchers and scientists, including in the cellular agriculture space. Ethically problematic Fetal bovine serum is made by harvesting the blood of bovine fetuses taken from pregnant cows during slaughter. Blood from the fetus is drawn out via a closed collection system and then transformed into a serum. FBS contains growth factors, hormones, …

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Wildtype's cultivated salmon nigiri

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Cultivated, Cell-Cultured & Biotechnology

€100,000 Cultivated Meat Innovation Challenge Launched by GFI and EIT

The Good Food Institute (GFI) and the European Union’s EIT Food have launched a new  €100,000 competition for the cultivated meat sector. Searching for innovative ways of bringing down the cost of cell culture media, up to four successful teams from across Europe will be awarded €100,000 each for the challenge. Looking for applications that show the ability to bring ideas to market within three years, the GFI Europe has strategically partnered with EIT Food to launch the €100,000 prizes to overcome one of the biggest hurdles to commercializing cultivated meat. The cost of cell culture media has been identified as one of the biggest technical challenges for the burgeoning cultivated meat industry.  Called the Cultivated Meat Innovation Challenge, the GFI states that successful applicants …

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CellMeat South Korea

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Cultivated, Cell-Cultured & Biotechnology

South Korea’s CellMEAT Produces Cell Culture Medium Without Fetal Bovine Serum

South Korean company CellMEAT‘s new product, a cell culture medium without foetal bovine serum, will help reduce the production costs of cultured meat and circumvent ethical concerns within the cultured meat industry. CellMEAT recently announced a pre-series A funding round of $4.5 million.  CellMEAT was selected as a participant in the Tech Incubator programme for startups in 2019. Recognised for its technical developments that could lead to more sustainable cultured meat production, it was nominated to participate in a collaborative research project investigating muscle stem cells for this area in 2021. Now the company has developed an FBS-free cell culture medium that could revolutionise production. Cell culture medium without fetal bovine serum The newly available cell culture medium without fetal bovine serum is the result …

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