a 2kg prototype of cultivated meat by TissenBioFarm .

© TissenBioFarm

Cultivated, Cell-Cultured & Biotechnology

South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety Accepting Submissions for Cultivated Meat Approval

South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (KFDA) has announced that it has opened an application process for the approval of cultivated meat after implementing cultivated food regulations and a framework to provide companies with guidelines. The news came after the KFDA revised and published the “Temporary Standards and Standards for Food Products,” stipulating the procedure for approving raw materials “made using technology,” such as cell and microbial cultures.  Cultivated food ingredients became eligible for certification as food ingredients through the revision of the Enforcement Rules of the Food Hygiene Act in May last year. Previously, they were only allowed for R&D purposes. However, under these temporary standards, cultivated food ingredients could be approved for sale for the first time. Sam Lawrence, GFI Vice President of Policy …

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Aleph Cuts cultivated steak

© Aleph Farms

Politics & Law

EU Ministers Against Cultivated Meat Debate at EU Council Using Misinformation Says GFI

Yesterday, at an EU Agriculture and Fisheries Council meeting, ministers gathered to discuss cultivated meat and its potential to benefit or threaten people and the environment. A coalition of 13 agricultural ministers, rather than 12 as initially reported by Euronews, led by Austria, France, and Italy, had sent a note to the EU council urging a revision of the regulatory approval framework for cultivated meat.  Supported by Czech, Cypriot, Greek, Hungarian, Luxembourg, Lithuanian, Maltese, Romanian, Slovak, and Spanish delegations, they raised concerns about the potential threat of cultivated meat to the economy, public health, and farmers while questioning its “naturalness” (fake meat) and sustainability. Austria’s Ministry of Health, which bears responsibility for food safety, has clarified that the note does not represent the stance of the Austrian government. A controversial …

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Three different dishes of cultivated meat: beef skewers, roast beef, and chicken breast

© Vital Meat

Politics & Law

12 EU Agriculture Ministers Form Coalition Against Cultivated Meat

A coalition of a dozen EU agriculture ministers will push for a revision of the regulatory approval framework for the authorization of cultivated meat at the EU Agriculture and Fisheries Council today. As reported by Euronews, Austria, France, and Italy proposed the initiative to The EU council, receiving support from the Czech, Cypriot, Greek, Hungarian, Luxembourg, Lithuanian, Maltese, Romanian, and Slovak delegations. The coalition sent a statement to the EU executive urging them to evaluate and initiate a public debate regarding the impact of cultivated meat, as they see the technology as a potential threat to the economy, public health, and farmers. The group is also looking to establish label guidelines that prohibit the names of animal products in “fake” meat and milk products. Despite Europe being …

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QUT analyses the politics of alternative proteins

Dr. Hope Johnson from the QUT School of Law. © QUT

Politics & Law

Australian Study Assesses Politics of Alternative Proteins as Regulators Make Moves to Approve Cultivated Meat

In light of Australia’s recent steps towards approving cultivated meat for sale, researchers from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) have analysed the Senate Inquiry into Definitions of Meat and Other Animal Products to assess the politics of alternative proteins. Led by Dr. Hope Johnson from the QUT School of Law, along with Melbourne Law School Professor Christine Parker and QUT researcher Dr. Brodie Evans, the study notes that many stakeholders were initially concerned that meat alternatives posed a threat to animal agriculture. However, they eventually concluded that alternative proteins were “not necessarily in competition with meat and dairy”. Both industries saw the labelling of meat alternatives as a key issue. The study notes a “lack of consumer complaints about the labelling of meat alternatives …

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Aleph Farms has received regulatory approval from Israel's Ministry of Health to sell its cultivated beef to the public.

© Aleph Farms

Cultivated Meat

Aleph Farms Receives World’s First Approval for Cultivated Beef, Petit Steak to Hit Israeli Restaurants Soon

Aleph Farms, a pioneer in Israel’s cultivated meat industry, announces regulatory approval from Israel’s Ministry of Health (MoH) through a “No Questions” letter, allowing the company to sell its cultivated beef to the public. This approval marks the world’s first approval for cultivated beef and positions Israel as the third country to approve cultivated meat products — after Singapore and the USA’s approval for cultivated chicken.  It is also the first green light for cultivated meat in the Middle East. “2024 stands to be a landmark year for the advancement of regulatory pathways and commercialization of cultivated meat. With this historic regulatory approval, Israel’s Ministry of Health (MoH) has firmly cemented its leadership position in introducing world-changing innovation in a way that builds trust with consumers,” said …

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Cellular Agriculture Australia (CAA) announces the release of a pioneering Regulation Resource Hub to help cell ag companies streamline their food safety application process for novel foods.

© Cellular Agriculture Australia (CAA)

Cultivated, Cell-Cultured & Biotechnology

Cellular Agriculture Australia Unveils New Resources to Help Companies Streamline Food Safety Applications

Nonprofit organisation Cellular Agriculture Australia (CAA) announces the release of its new Regulation Resource Hub, created to help cell ag companies streamline their food safety application process for novel foods and gene technology in Australia and New Zealand.  CAA’s new pay-to-access tool includes tailored online learning materials, dossier templates, and step-by-step guidance on Australia’s food safety regulation framework. While the Australian regulatory framework is well-equipped to approve novel foods, there is a lack of precedents on how companies should navigate the regulatory process, argues CAA. The resources have been developed in collaboration with leading industry partners and regulatory consultants and in consultation with Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ).  “Australia has an opportunity to be one of the global leaders in cellular agriculture and accessible, time-efficient and cost-effective …

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Vital Meat has submitted a novel food regulatory dossier to the Singapore Food Agency (SFA) seeking pre-market approval for its cultivated chicken, Vital Chicken.

© Vital Meat

Cultivated Meat

France’s Vital Meat Submits Pre-Market Dossier to Launch Cultivated Chicken in Singapore

French cultivated meat company, Vital Meat, announces it has submitted a novel food pre-market regulatory dossier to the Singapore Food Agency (SFA) seeking approval to launch its cultivated chicken, Vital Chicken, in the country. The biotech stated that Singapore‘s progressive thinking and willingness to embrace new technologies position it as an ideal market to launch its safe and delicious product.  If Vital Chicken receives the SFA’s pre-market approval, Vital Meat will become the first European cultivated meat company to sell its products in Singapore — a sought-after race among biotech companies. In 2019, SFA introduced a novel food regulatory framework, requiring companies to seek pre-market allowance by submitting safety assessments for SFA’s review. Singapore, the first country to allow cultivated meat, has approved only GOOD Meat’s cultivated …

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Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) has concluded that Vow's cultivated quail it is safe to eat.

© Vow

Cultivated Meat

Australia Closer to Approve Cultivated Meat: Food Standards Concludes Vow’s Cultivated Quail is Safe to Eat

Australia and New Zealand’s alt protein think tank Food Frontier announces that the cultivated meat company Vow is closer to receiving novel foods approval to produce and sell a cultivated quail product in both countries. Earlier this year, Vow became the first Australian cultivated meat company to apply for regulatory approval. And now, after months of scientific and safety assessment of the product and its manufacturing method, Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) has concluded that Vow’s cultivated quail is safe to eat.  FSANZ is now sharing its findings as part of the public consultation process, allowing consumers to provide feedback on Vow’s cultivated quail in the next six weeks. In its call for public submissions, FSANZ proposes several labelling requirements for cell-based products to avoid consumer …

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© Uncommon

Politics & Law

UK Food Standards Agency Unveils New Guidance on Authorisation Process for Cell-Cultivated Products in Great Britain

The UK’s Food Standards Agency (FSA) has recently released guidance for businesses on cell-cultivated products and the authorisation process to market these products in Great Britain.  The FSA is responsible for food safety and food hygiene in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. However, this guide is specific to England and Wales.  The FSA’s new guidance combines general food law regulations with novel food and GMO regulations and offers business advice to streamline the authorisation process. It includes definitions, status, application details, and recommendations on product safety, labelling, and tasting trials. The UK government has been looking to streamline the approval for cultivated meat to boost food security and sustainability. Meanwhile, the first cultivated meat product on the market is still pending in the UK. To …

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Czech startup Bene Meat Technologies (BMT) has become the first company in the world to obtain EU Certification to produce and sell cultivated meat for pet food.

© Bene Meat Technologies (BMT)

Pet Food

Bene Meat Technologies Receives First-Ever EU Approval for Cultivated Meat for Pet Food 

Article amendment 21st November: please refer to the situation in full as described here, with the series of events updated with further developments since this story was first published on 8th November. Czech startup Bene Meat Technologies (BMT) claims it has become the first company in the world to receive EU Certification to produce and sell cultivated meat for pet food. It was only this January that the startup announced it was developing animal cell lines to produce cultivated meat ingredients for the pet food industry. Nonetheless, today, BMT announces that it has received a license from the European Feed Materials Register to commercialise its products. This organization oversees the authorization of additives and covers for animal feed in the EU and EEA markets.   …

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Ivy Farm Sausage

Image courtesy of Ivy Farm

Politics & Law

UK Government Seeks to Accelerate Approval of Cultivated Meat to Boost Food Security and Sustainability

UK ministers and regulators are looking to accelerate the approval of cultivated meat to boost food security and sustainability, reports The Telegraph.  Expediting the arrival of novel sustainable proteins to the market involves acknowledging the impact of animal agriculture on global warming, the rising costs of meat, and the growing population trend. George Freeman, Minister of State for Science, Research and Innovation, told The Telegraph that more than traditional husbandry may be required to meet the increasing demand for meat. Approval for the first cultivated meat product is still pending in the UK. Only the Israeli company Aleph Farms has submitted a pre-market authorization dossier to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to launch cultivated beef steaks in the country. The company is also seeking regulatory approval in Europe. Streamlining the approval …

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Natures Fynd cheese spread on bagel

© Nature's Fynd

Company News

Nature’s Fynd Receives Health Canada’s Approval to Market Alt Products Powered by the “Fungus from Yellowstone Park”

Chicago-based Nature’s Fynd has received authorization from Health Canada, the federal department responsible for national health standards and policy, to commercialize its alt meat and dairy products made with a novel fungi protein called Fy. Nature’s Fynd grows its fungi protein using proprietary fermentation and a fungus called Fusarium strain flavolapis, discovered in Yellowstone Park’s geothermal springs. The novel protein is used as a whole ingredient to make animal-free foods. According to Health Canada, the product approval came after a comprehensive assessment of Fy Protein’s safety for human consumption. In the USA, Nature’s Fynd received FDA greenlight for its fungi ingredient in March 2021.  Similarly, the Canadian food company Smallfood also discovered a wild microalgae strain capable of producing premium proteins through biomass fermentation. The company is …

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Aleph Farms launches Aleph Cuts brand ahead of commercialization

Image courtesy of Aleph Farms

Company News

Aleph Farms Submits Dossier to Launch Cultivated Beef Steaks in the UK

Only a few days after becoming the first company to seek regulatory approval for cultivated meat in Europe, the Israeli company Aleph Farms announces it has submitted a pre-market authorization dossier to the Food Standards Agency (FSA) to launch cultivated beef steaks in the UK. The news comes just in time to celebrate tomorrow’s anniversary of the world’s first-ever cultivated beef burger, developed by Dr. Mark Post and presented in London ten years ago. Since then, the industry has achieved various milestones in bringing cultivated meat to consumers. While Aleph Farms seeks to launch Aleph Cuts in the old continent, cultivated meat has been available in Singapore since December 2020. And with recent FDA approvals, US consumers can try cultivated chicken at China Chilcano restaurant or at Bar Crenn. …

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Aleph Cuts cultivated steak

© Aleph Farms

Cultivated Meat

First European Application for the Sale of Cultivated Meat – What You Need to Know

Israel’s Aleph Farms has submitted an application to Swiss regulators to sell its cultivated beef. Aleph Farm’s application to the Swiss authorities is submitted with the goal of selling the world’s first cultivated beef steaks under the Aleph Cuts brand in Switzerland, which would represent the first in the continent if approval is granted.   A life-cycle assessment shows that cultivated beef could result in a reduction of 92% of carbon footprint if renewable energy is used in the production process, 95% of land use and 78% of water requirements, compared to conventional beef production. Swiss and EU regulatory processes In a manner similar to that of the European Union, the Swiss regulatory framework encompasses a robust and well-founded procedure for assessing the safety of …

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Aleph Farms submited an application to Swiss regulators, marking the first-ever submission for cultivated meat in europe

© Aleph Farms

Company News

Aleph Farms Becomes First in Europe to Submit Cultivated Meat for Novel Foods Approval in Switzerland

Cultivated meat company Aleph Farms announces it has initiated the regulatory approval process to commercialize in Switzerland its premium Angus-style thin cultivated steak — dubbed the Petit Steak and claimed as the world’s first cultivated steak — marking it the first-ever submission for cultivated meat in Europe. Aleph Farms says it has submitted an application for placing on the market novel and novel traditional foodstuffs to the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO). It is worth noting that if Aleph Farms gets novel food approval in Switzerland, the EU requires authorization from the European Commission for market placement in the region.  The Israeli company has previously announced plans to launch its brand of cultivated meat Aleph Cuts in Singapore and Israel in limited quantities (tasting experiences) once the …

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Cultivated meat made with serum-free cell growth media

© Eat Just

Company News

Setting the Record Straight: Eat Just is First Cultivated Meat Company to Receive USDA Label Approval

In a turn of events, and further to our article published some hours ago, UPSIDE Foods is in fact the second cultivated meat company in the US to receive label approval from USDA, not the first, as the company claimed in its widely distributed press release today. Following the publication of the UPSIDE news on ours and other platforms, Eat Just contacts vegconomist to set the record straight: “GOOD Meat (Eat Just’s cultivated arm) received approval of our label on June 8,” says the California food tech, adding that the company was not planning to make an announcement until after it had received its Grant of Inspection, representing the final step in the regulatory approval process. What came first, the chicken or the … chicken? …

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Remilk animal-free milk protein

© Remilk

Milk- and Dairy Alternatives

“Historic Achievement” as Remilk Receives Regulatory Approval for Animal-Free Milk Protein

Remilk has become the first company ever to receive regulatory approval for animal-free milk protein from the Israeli Ministry of Health. Described as a “historic achievement”, the approval will allow products made with Remilk proteins to be sold to Israeli consumers. This will make Israel one of the first countries worldwide to offer consumers real animal-free dairy products without lactose or cholesterol. Thorough testing by the Ministry of Health has determined that Remilk’s product is “safe, of high-quality, and identical to its cow-derived counterpart”. “The breakthrough achievement of Remilk’s R&D team lies in its success in converting a technology that has been used for decades to create components for the food industry (such as vitamins and enzymes) in small quantities, to produce one of the …

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Peace of Meat's cultivated poultry

© Peace of Meat

Company News

Peace of Meat Refocuses Resources Ahead of Cultivated Avian Product Launch in Singapore 

As part of its plan to launch a cultivated avian product onto the Singaporean market, Israeli 3D-printed cultivated meat company Steakholder Foods has announced a strategic restructuring of its Belgian subsidiary, Peace of Meat (PoM). The changes are designed to streamline PoM’s operations and position it for success. “Today’s announcement is an important step in our efforts to successfully launch a product in the Singaporean market,” said Arik Kaufman, Steakholder Foods’ CEO. Refocusing resources PoM’s 2023 business plan will focus on regulatory submissions for its avian product. This includes submitting to the Singapore Food Agency (SFA) by the end of the year and preparing for submission in the USA. To speed up production, PoM will outsource production to a third-party plant, thus eliminating the need to …

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cultivated quail

© Vow

Cultivated Meat

Vow Begins Regulatory Approval Process to Launch Cultivated Quail in Australia by 2024

Australia’s Vow has become the first cultivated meat company in the country to begin the regulatory approval process with Food Standards Australian New Zealand (FSANZ), hoping to launch a line of cultivated quail called Morsel in restaurants by 2024. The food tech announces it had submitted an application seeking to amend the food standards code to approve its novel food, stating its cultivated quail is safe to eat.  Now the FSANZ needs to conduct its scientific and safety assessment to confirm the safety of Vow’s manufacturing process, stability of the cell line, ingredients, and final product.  Rare Japanese quail Vow’s cultivated quail originates from cells of the rare Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica. According to the food tech, it has a stable quail cell line that does …

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Bored Cow Original

© Bored Cow

Milk- and Dairy Alternatives

This Week in Alt Dairy News: Innovations Fuel the New Dairy Revolution

This week in alt dairy news, featuring three new innovations from Oatly, Bored Cow, and Remilk. We note Oatly’s oat-based cream cheese launch, not in Sweden but in Philadelphia, where cream cheese is said to be born; Bored Cow launches Bored Cow Original, “the first milk alternative to do it all”; and Remilk’s whey proteins receive safety approval in important and dynamic markets. Dear readers, animal-free dairy is here to stay.  Oatly’s new Philadelphia style cream cheese Oatly has announced a limited release of its newest innovation, an oat-based cream cheese developed by Oatly’s Philadelphia-based food scientists, in the style of the famous Philadelphia spread. The new plant-based cream cheese will launch exclusively in “Philly” before it’s released to the U.S. market later this year. …

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